You are here: Home / About Us / News and Media / 2007 News / Ontario Cancer Plan: 2006-07 Annual Progress Report released at Mount Sinai Hospital
Share:

Ontario Cancer Plan: 2006-07 Annual Progress Report released at Mount Sinai Hospital

January 26, 2007 -- Progress is being made to provide earlier screening and treatment and reduced wait times for surgery and radiation therapy in the Province, according to the Ontario Cancer Plan: 2006-07 Annual Progress Report, released during a news conference at Mount Sinai Hospital on January 26.
Mount Sinai President and CEO Joseph Mapa (from left) with the Honourable George Smitherman, Minister of Health and Long-Term Care, and Mount Sinai Chair of the Board Lawrence Bloomberg

Cancer Care
Mount Sinai President and CEO Joseph Mapa (from left) with the Honourable George Smitherman, Minister of Health and Long-Term Care, and Mount Sinai Chair of the Board Lawrence Bloomberg.

“The battle against cancer is a tough fight, but together, we’re beating this disease,” said the Honourable George Smitherman, Minister of Health and Long-Term Care. “The Ontario Cancer Plan provides us with strategies on how to deal with cancer in the coming years and build on the progress we’ve achieved to date to deliver quality cancer care to Ontario patients.”

The report shows that cancer prevention, detection and treatment has improved this past year, but more action is needed to reduce cancer risks and ensure timely, high-quality care is delivered consistently across the Province.

It cites innovations such as computerized physician order entry, increased screening for colorectal cancer and the campaign for a Smoke Free Ontario in increasing patient safety and improving outcomes. Wait times for cancer surgery have also stabilized, says the report, with 91 per cent of all cases completed within the provincial target of 84 days.

Terry Sullivan, President and CEO of Cancer Care Ontario, said someone in Ontario is diagnosed with cancer every eight minutes, a figure that will decrease to only six minutes in 10 years time based on current trends. That means Ontario needs to continue its strong planning efforts.

“Through initiatives in the Ontario Cancer Plan, we have better information about where the cancer system is performing well and where it is falling short for patients and the population,” said Sullivan.

Recently, Mount Sinai Hospital re-aligned its services into four Centres of Excellence, including Oncology and Surgical Sub-Specialties, as part of its strategic plan, Building on the Best.

“This will allow us to create a more streamlined care process, where patients receive all services within the umbrella of each Centre of Excellence,” said Dr. Jay Wunder, Surgeon-in-Chief of Mount Sinai Hospital, and Clinical Chief for the Centre of Excellence.

“In addition, this structure allows us to better track and measure both the timeliness and the quality of service. Every day, we strive to ensure our cancer patients receive the best possible care, be it surgery or any other clinical treatment voyage.”

Mount Sinai Hospital and its neighbour Princess Margaret Hospital are an example of care providers working together to improve outcomes. Many cancer patients have surgery at Mount Sinai with renowned surgical teams and then receive follow-up care at Princess Margaret with dedicated teams that have expert knowledge in other aspects of cancer care.

“It is under the guidance of the Ontario Cancer Plan that Mount Sinai Hospital is working closely within our region, with the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care and among other health care providers in Ontario to provide the best care for cancer patients — now and in the future,” said Joseph Mapa, President and CEO of Mount Sinai Hospital, a recognized leader in both surgical oncology and outpatient cancer care.

Minister Smitherman said that in addition to increased cancer surgery capacity in the Ontario health-care system, there are a number of actions individuals “have the power” to make to reduce their chances of getting cancer, including “being a little more active, eating more fruits and vegetables and not smoking or, if you do, not subjecting people around you to second-hand smoke…We all have the power within us to make these changes.”


Wellness @ Mount Sinai
In order to help make those changes, Mount Sinai Hospital offers a comprehensive wellness program for staff that includes yoga, massage therapy, fitness and meditation. Mount Sinai also has a smoking cessation expert in Dale Mackey, who is available for one-on-one consultations at 416-586-4800 ext. 5009.

For more information on the Ontario Cancer Plan, please visit www.cancercare.on.ca.