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April 2011

News items from April 2011

Tai Chi for easing Chronic Pain
Dr. Adam Chen of the Rehab and Wellbeing Centre tells Global Ontario about the first hospital based medical Tai Chi program in the Greater Toronto area that is helping to relieve chronic pain.

Combating the stigma around prostate cancer screening
Dr. Alexandre Zlotta, Director of Uro-oncology at the Murray Koffler Urologic Wellness Centre explains to Global Ontario that black men are at an increased risk for prostate cancer and that for them the disease is more agressive.

Canadian seniors: The doctor will see you now
Dr. Samir Sinha, Director of Geriatrics tells the Globe and Mail that few physician trainees make house calls to see elderly patients which is a lower cost option that can benefit both patients and doctors.. 

The driving physicians, homeward bound, make their rounds
Lisa Priest of the Globe and Mail rides along with Drs. Samir Sinha and Mark Nowaczynski as they made house calls to elderly patients and sees first hand the difference it makes.

Yoga fans raise money for cancer research
The Mount Sinai Hospital Auxiliary's third annual Yoga in Motion event saw hundreds of participants turn out for a full-day fitness marathon of Yoga and Zumba raising more than $150,000 for breast and ovarian cancer research.

Reducing pain for kids' tests in hospital
Kirsten Christie, our NICU patient advocate in the Valentine Neonatal Intensive Care Unit shares how parents can be empowered to work with doctors and nurses to ensure pain is managed for babies and children undergoing tests in hospitals.

Screening key to rare colon cancer; The good news about bad news: Genetic test identifies those with Lynch Syndrome
Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of cancer deaths in Canada. Some 9,100 Canadians die each year and 22,500 are diagnosed. Dr. Robert Gryfe and Melyssa Aronson of the Zane Cohen Centre for Digestive Diseases talk about screening for Lynch Syndrome, the most common form of hereditary form of the disease.

Doctor, heal thyself
Dr. Brian Goldman of the Schwartz/Reisman Emergency Centre has a candid conversation with the Winnipeg Free Press about his experiences as an Emergency Room physician.

Canadian researchers are using the new science of optogenetics to probe and map the brain
Dr. Kenichi Okamoto, Investigator at the Samuel Lunenfeld Research Insititute tells the Globe and Mail about using lasers to activate specific brain proteins in animal models that are involved in memory and learning and to investigate the role these proteins may play in Alzheimer’s disease and autism.

House calls: A new vision of elder care
Drs. Samir Sinha and Mark Nowaczynski tell Hospital News about Mount Sinai's partnership with House Calls to home based primary and specialty care for older Canadians.

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