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Beating the Odds on Male Infertility

The Murray Koffler Centre for Urologic Wellness has over 12,000 patient visits each year from all over Canada and many parts of the world.
Beating the Odds on Male Infertility

Dr. Jarvi is a leader in developing new microsurgery techniques that are minimally invasive but are seeing strong results.

One million Canadian men facing infertility issues could see their hopes of fatherhood fulfilled as a result of Dr. Keith Jarvi’s pioneering work. As Director of Canada’s largest male infertility clinic at Mount Sinai Hospital, Dr. Jarvi is a leader in developing new microsurgery techniques that are minimally invasive but are seeing strong results. Infertility affects 15 per cent of Canadian couples, and male infertility contributes in about half of all cases.

Dr. Jarvi has developed some of the most cutting edge male fertility procedures being used today. He was the first in Canada to develop two techniques to retrieve sperm in patients with low counts, using aspiration for in-vitro fertilization, and high-resolution ultrasound. He also developed a minimally invasive technique to perform a vasectomy reversal and techniques to surgically bridge gaps in the reproductive tract, which are now in widespread use internationally. “We can now offer 98 per cent of men with infertility a treatment that has a good chance of success. Men who come to our clinic who previously had no hope of having children are offered treatments that allows them to become biological fathers. The impact on the couples’ lives is tremendous,” says Dr. Jarvi, Head of Urology and Director of the Murray Koffler Urologic Wellness Centre, which has over 12,000 patient visits from all over Canada and many parts of the world each year.

His latest innovations include using biomarkers to both assess and treat male infertility. Traditionally, a testicular biopsy and invasive surgery were needed to assess a man’s fertility. Dr. Jarvi and Dr. Eleftherios Diamandis, an investigator at the Samuel Lunenfeld Research Institute of Mount Sinai Hospital, have developed a new diagnostic test that uses protein biomarkers, a significantly less invasive test than a biopsy. This new test could be offered to Mount Sinai patients within a year. Under Dr. Jarvi’s Directorship of the Murray Koffler Urologic Wellness Centre, and with the collaboration of internationally recognized researchers such as Mount Sinai Hospital’s Dr. Alexandre Zlotta, researchers are using the same biomarker technology to detect prostate cancer earlier and more accurately than the current PSA test. “We are working to find markers to diagnose the aggressive prostate cancers early while they can still be treated. These developments could save lives by allowing us to treat men early and aggressively if they need treatment and avoid therapy for the men who would not benefit from treatment. This is truly personalized medicine at its best,” says Dr. Jarvi.